Jessica On The Web – Cell Phones Or Online

My teacher asked some questions (in 5 of her classes) about cell phones, online time and access questions and here are the results.

1. Students averaged 68 text messages per week. The high was 131, the low was 24.

2. 72% of students said they spent more time on the phone or texting than they did online.

3. 14% of students said they used the Web to research homework projects.

4. 86% of the students have cell phones.

5. 92% of the students have access to the internet at home.

6. 41% have high speed access.

7. 22% of students sent an email within the last week.

8. 100% of the students know someone that uses Myspace.

9. 43% of students have their own computer.

10. 5% of students said that their online time is monitored by their parents.

We also voted on questions to ask the experts and came up with 10 questions. We decided that is would be best to ask two questions a week. Here are the first two.

Q. Should HTML be taught in High School? If so, should CSS be taught with it?

Q. Are search engines replacing libraries for scholastic research?

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  1. Students averaged 68 text messages per week. The high was 131, the low was 24.

    I wasn’t expecting that high of a number. 131?!! Does everyone sit around in class sending text messages?

    14% of students said they used the Web to research homework projects.

    22% of students sent an email within the last week.

    I was also surprised by those numbers, I would have predicted a much higher percentage.

    Should HTML be taught in High School? If so, should CSS be taught with it?

    I learned a little HTML in high school (1994). Granted, I think it was a BASIC class or something. I would imagine with the direction things are going, it would only make sense. CSS? of course!

    Are search engines replacing libraries for scholastic research?

    Would have assumed it was, but with only 14% of students using it for research, maybe not.

    Of course this is a biased sample, but interesting information. Thanks again for your post Jessica!

  2. Personaly I wish they wouldn’t teach tables until after you knew CSS, bad habits are hard to break. I don’t think everyone needs to know HTML, but knowing HTML without CSS is an incomplete education.

    Search engines are faster, quicker, and easier than libraries, but there’s no editorial control. If something made it’s way into a reference book and is in a library, you knowing it was reasonably accurate at the time it was printed. Finding accurate information online is a bit more difficult.

  3. I’m with Michael on the library issue. There’s a lot of misinformation on the Web that’s easy to confuse with the real thing.

    But I don’t agree with him about CSS – my partner and I are on the top of page 1 for nearly every term we target and most of those pages are full of tables.

  4. DG

    I called the teacher this morning to ask about that 14% figure. The current curriculum is designed so that the majority of the work can be completed without external sources, (that could be scary).

    But I asked about required reading in the Civics class. All the students taking Civics are required to read five political blogs chosen from a list. Many of the students didn’t consider that ‘research’.

  5. Garrett

    59% of the students DON’T have high speed! That must be a rough online experience (perhaps they’re the heavy mobile users?).

    I agree that HTML s/b offered, but don’t think it s/b mandatory (I’m sure there’s lots of people who could care less). CSS is definitely important since the newer browsers render it pretty consistently. I too am a table guy (mostly) b/c CSS can still get wonky in older browsers (eventually older browser versions will die though…depends upon your user base).

  6. DG

    >>59% of the students DON’T have high speed!

    Yeah, the options here are satellite and dial-up. Satellite is probably pricey for some, installation ranging from $800 to $1500. They do have high speed access from school.

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